KNOW YOUR RIGHTS: WHAT TO DO IF YOUR RIGHTS ARE VIOLATED AT A PROTEST
The right to join with fellow citizens in protest or peaceful assembly is critical to a functioning democracy and at the core of the First Amendment. Unfortunately, law enforcement officials sometimes violate this right through means intended to thwart free public expression. In recent history, challenges to the right to protest have come in many forms. In some cases, police crack down on demonstrations through mass arrests, illegal use of force, or curfews. Elsewhere, law enforcement limits expression by corralling protesters into so-called “free-speech zones.” And increasingly, new surveillance technologies are turned on innocent people, collecting information on their activities by virtue of their association with or proximity to a given protest. Even without active obstruction of the right to protest, limitations on that right or fear of police intimidation can chill expressive activity and result in self-censorship. The ACLU, along with affiliates across the country, monitors the government’s respect for this foundational right. We intervene—through police departments, the courts, and the dissemination of
Know Your Rights materials—so that the right to public expression is respected for everyone.

https://www.aclu.org/issues/free-speech/internet-speech
The digital revolution has produced the most diverse, participatory, and amplified communications medium humans have ever had: the Internet. The ACLU believes in an uncensored Internet, a vast free-speech zone deserving at least as much First Amendment protection as that afforded to traditional media such as books, newspapers, and magazines.
The ACLU has been at the forefront of protecting online freedom of expression in its myriad forms. We brought the first case in which the U.S. Supreme Court declared speech on the Internet equally worthy of the First Amendment’s historical protections. In that case,
Reno v. American Civil Liberties Union, the Supreme Court held that the government can no more restrict a person’s access to words or images on the Internet than it can snatch a book out of someone’s hands or cover up a nude statue in a museum. But that principle has not prevented constant new threats to Internet free speech. The ACLU remains vigilant against laws or policies that create new decency restrictions for online content, limit minors’ access to information, or allow the unmasking of anonymous speakers without careful court scrutiny.
Sarasota County Commissioners“The press was to serve the governed, not the governors.”
—U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black in New York Times Co. v. United States (1971)
The freedom of the press, protected by the First Amendment, is critical to a democracy in which the government is accountable to the people. A free media functions as a watchdog that can investigate and report on government wrongdoing. It is also a vibrant marketplace of ideas, a vehicle for ordinary citizens to express themselves and gain exposure to a wide range of information and opinions.
The rise of the national security state and the proliferation of new surveillance technologies have created new challenges to media freedom. The government has launched an unprecedented crackdown on whistleblowers, targeting journalists in order to find their sources. Whistleblowers face prosecution under the World War One-era Espionage Act for leaks to the press in the public interest. And in the face of a growing surveillance apparatus, journalists must go to new lengths to protect sources and, by extension, the public’s right to know.  
The ACLU has played a central role in defending the freedom of the press, from our role in the landmark
Pentagon Papers case to our defense of whistleblower Edward Snowden and our advocacy for a new media shield law. When press freedom is harmed, it is much harder to hold our government accountable when it missteps or overreaches.

https://www.fbi.gov/investigate/public-corruption

The Bureau’s Public Corruption program focuses on:
  • Investigating violations of federal law by public officials at the federal, state, and local levels of government;
  • Overseeing the nationwide investigation of allegations of fraud related to federal government procurement, contracts, and federally funded programs;
  • Combating the threat of public corruption along the nation’s borders and points of entry in order to decrease the country’s vulnerability to drug and weapons trafficking, alien smuggling, espionage, and terrorism.
  • Addressing environmental crime, election fraud, and matters concerning the federal government procurement, contracts, and federally funded programs.

"The guy has to say something about everything!!! It's all against him, and he is a crusader for justice (LOL) watch that go on a website!!" As quoted by Sergio Gonzalez of the Department of Business and Professional Regulation - Regional Program Administrator.

Harvey Ayers
Sarasota County
Code Corruption